Press "Enter" to skip to content

Month: February 2020

CEO Blog: February 7, 2020

Induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS cells were discovered in 2012 by the Nobel prize winner Shinya Yamanaka, who is a professor at Kyoto University. Despite the option of building wealth by keeping this world-changing invention private, Dr. Yamanaka has decided to open source iPS cell-related technology to encourage researchers and pharmaceutical companies to adopt iPS cells. He thought this was the best option for patients with illnesses that could not be cured with existing treatments.

Almost ten years have passed since, and a number of clinical trials using iPS cells and transplantation into actual patients have been performed. Japan has always been a frontrunner in this field, and thanks to Dr. Yamanaka, the Japanese government has decided to invest $1B in regenerative medicine research in 10 years. While other countries have focused on research on ES cells rather than iPS cells, it was difficult to perform clinical trials and transplantation on humans given the ethical challenge that ES cells can only be produced from human embryos.

Japan was indeed leading the regenerative medicine field. Until recently.

Now, there is a bio-startup that Dr. Yamanaka calls “a threat.” That is BlueRock Therapeutics in the United States. The company has begun a clinical trial to transplant nerve cells made from iPS cells into patients with Parkinson’s disease and is working on treating heart failure with cardiomyocytes made from iPS cells and severe intestinal disease with gut nerve cells. These are completely competing with the efforts of Kyoto University’s CiRA to which Dr. Yamanaka belongs.

BlueRock Therapeutics is a bio-startup that was originally funded by Bayer and other companies and became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bayer in August 2019. The amount raised by the company at the time of its establishment was about $225M, far exceeding the sum of all the funds collected by CiRA in the past. In addition, Fate Therapeutics in the United States has started making immune cells that attack cancer using iPS cells and administering them to actual patients.

Japan wins in technology and loses in business. This composition, which has been often said in the industrial world, has just begun to appear in the field of regenerative medicine. Japan is beginning to lag behind the United States in funding and commercialization. Moreover, the Japanese government announced a $10M annual budget cutoff for the iPS stockpile business, which was withdrawn at a later date, but the fact that the Japanese government once capped iPS cells remains unchanged.

So what should we do in Japan? Moving to the United States and continuing research is one way to do that. Although one may argue about national interests from a short-term perspective, there are patients all over the world who want treatment using iPS cells. For such patients, it doesn’t matter in which country they were made. If human life is paramount, crossing national borders should be a valid option.

Another way is to enter from different industries. A prejudice, which iPS cells and regenerative medicine should be handled only by researchers and companies involved in biotechnology, should be eliminated first. There are many areas where Japan has strengths, such as robotics, FA, and IoT. By having the companies from these fields enter in biotechnology and having them invest in research, at least the funding problem can be solved.

Also, there is “integration” that Japanese people are good at. By combining things originally made for different purposes, Japanese people kept creating a completely new added value. This is the way Japan has come a long way in industry and fought the world. I think this analog tactic is what is needed in the field of biotechnology and regenerative medicine in Japan.

 

人工多能性幹細胞(iPS細胞)は、2012年に京都大学の教授であるノーベル賞受賞者である山中伸也先生によって発見されました。この世紀の発明を独り占めにして富を築くという選択肢もあったなか、山中先生は、研究者や企業にiPS細胞の採用を促すため、iPS細胞の関連技術をオープンソース化することを決めました。既存の治療法では治癒できない疾患を持つ患者さんにとって、これが最良の選択だと考えたためです。

あれからほぼ10年が経過し、iPS細胞を使った臨床試験や実際の患者への移植が幾つも行われました。日本は常にこの分野のフロントランナーで、山中先生のおかげで日本政府も再生医療研究に10年間で1,100億円の予算を投じることを決めました。一方の他国は、iPS細胞ではなくES細胞の研究に注力しましたが、ES細胞はヒトの胚からしか作製できないという倫理的な課題を抱えていることから、なかなかヒトに対する臨床試験や移植は行われませんでした。

日本はまさに再生医療分野をリードしていたのです。つい最近までは。

いま、山中先生が「脅威である」と名指しする、あるバイオ・ベンチャーがあります。米国のブルーロック・セラピューティクスです。同社は、iPS細胞から作った神経細胞をパーキンソン病患者に移植する臨床試験に着手し、iPS細胞から作った心筋細胞で心不全、腸の神経細胞で重い腸の病気の治療に取り組んでいます。これらは、山中先生が所属する京大CiRAの取り組みと完全に競合しています。

ブルーロック・セラピューティクスは、もともとバイエル薬品らが資金を拠出して作られたバイオ・ベンチャーで、2019年8月にバイエル薬品が完全子会社化しています。ちなみに、同社が設立時に集めた金額は約250億円で、これはCiRAが過去に集めた全ての資金を合算した金額を遥かに超えています。他にも米国フェイト・セラピューティクスは、がんを攻撃する免疫細胞をiPS細胞で作製し、実際の患者さんへの投与を始めています。

日本は技術で勝って、ビジネスで負ける。これまで産業界でよく言われていたこの構図が、まさに再生医療の分野でも起き始めています。米国に対して、資金と実用化の面で遅れを取り始めています。しかも、ここに来て、日本政府はiPS備蓄事業に対する年間10億円の予算打ち切りを表明しました。これは後日になって撤回されましたが、日本政府がiPS細胞に一旦見限りをつけたという事実は変わりません。

では、日本にいる我々は何をすべきなのでしょうか。アメリカに移って研究を続ける、それも1つの手段としてあるでしょう。短期的な視点で国益云々という話はでるかもしれませんが、iPS細胞を使った治療を望む患者さんは世界中にいます。そういった患者さんにとっては、どの国で作られたものなのかなど関係ありません。ヒトの命を最優先するならば、国境を超えるという選択肢はありです。

もう1つの手段は、やはり異業種からの参入です。iPS細胞や再生医療などといったものは、バイオに携わる研究者や企業だけが手掛けるべき、この先入観をまず無くすことだと考えます。ロボティクス、FA、IoTなど、日本が強みを持つ分野はたくさんあります。こういった分野のプレーヤーがバイオに参入して研究予算を投じることで、少なくとも資金の問題は解決可能です。

あとは、これも日本人が得意とするところのいわゆる「すりあわせ」です。もともと別の用途に作られたものを上手に組み合わせて、全く新しい付加価値を持たせる。これは日本が産業界でずとっとやってきて、世界と戦ってきたやり方です。ややもすれば、このアナログな戦術こそ、日本のバイオ・再生医療の分野で求められるものだと考えています。