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Month: April 2019

Narrowing Down To Two Slack Channels

First off, I’m not exactly a big fan of Slack. I feel like I’m forced to find a tiny comment within a thousand lines of source code written by someone else. If you are a software developer, you know what I mean.

That feeling is coming from the fact that Slack is mainly designed for a software developer and it’s a very text-heavy product. Slack is an awesome communication tool when you use it properly in your organization. But at the same time, it can kill your time as CEO.

As a company gets bigger, you as a CEO get invited into so many Slack (or Facebook, WhatsApp, whatever messaging app) channels that you should not be part of. Even though I’m making my position crystal clear, I keep getting such an invitation from the people inside and outside the company all the time. When that happens, I simply share my above blog post and quit the channel with a little apology.

My ultimate goal is to narrow down my Slack channels into just two. They are not #general and #random channels, where you are a member by default. I’m talking about #whatceoisthinking and #troubleshooting channels.

The former is what the channel name says. It’s a place for the CEO to share his/her thoughts company-wide. The latter is the place for the employees where they can request a special assistance from the CEO in order to troubleshoot anything that’s preventing their job from getting it done.

Troubleshooting is the privilege of the CEO and not so many CEOs think that way. Let’s take a look at my typical day schedule. I will explain why.

Amongst the tasks listed above, everything except for the last item can be done by other people. You can delegate these tasks to your employees. However, there are types of troubles that can be solved by the CEO only and they range from fixing a relationship between employees to making an apology to a loyal customer.

You as CEO want to troubleshoot anything as early as possible because it gets really messy if you leave it for quite some time. In order to do so, you need a channel to watch out for any potential trouble within the company. This is the reason why you need a dedicated channel for it and you need to be open for feedback from the employees.

Hopefully, one day I can be the CEO who runs his company by dealing with these two channels only.

CEO Must Not Work More Than 8 Hours A Day

This is my response to the latest episode from This Week in Startups podcast. The talk was done by Joel Spolsky, a founder of Stack Overflow and Trello. The latter was acquired by Atlassian for $425 million as we all know.

During this 50 minutes long conversation, I particularly liked the below statement.

“I rarely worked more than 8 hours a day in my entire career because I figured if I’m working more than 8 hours a day then I have failed to delegate something.”

A delegation, in other words, letting someone else do a job for you is one of the fundamental tasks that a CEO needs to do. If a CEO can leave the office before anyone, it is a good sign that the CEO is actually doing the right job.

Instead, the CEO should spend 100% of his time for hiring people smarter than him and making sure a company doesn’t run out of money. Telling a vision and defining a long-term goal is another thing only the CEO can do.

If you are a CEO working more than 8 hours a day or doing jobs other than ones stated above, then you are not doing the right job. You need to hire people to whom you can delegate a job. You need to finance in order to hire these people. You need to tell them a vision and a long-term goal so they don’t lose their way.